Thursday, November 12, 2009

Intimacy in Marriage Presentation

This is the presentation I gave on emotional, spiritual, and physical intimacy in marriage during the third hour of block meetings on Sunday, December 30, 2007. We also gave out copies of Laura Brotherson's excellent book on marital intimacy And They Were Not Ashamed. (I still have a few in the bishop's office for those who want a copy. We also have CDs for loan.)

For a PDF of the content of the slides, click here. You can also see it below. Click on the screen icon on the lower-right corner to view the document at full screen.
Since giving this presentation, here's a new summation of what I think a wife really wants from her husband:
  • To be loved and cherished by him more than any other person or other thing
  • To be the most important person in his life
  • To feel that no one else or nothing else is in higher demand for his attention
  • To be willing to listen to her needs and frustrations and to talk about his feelings
  • To respect her wishes, even if he can't fulfill them at the moment
  • To show her affection daily (without strings attached for physical intimacy)
  • Speaking respectfully of her in front of others, especially the children, even when she is not present
  • To forgive her for her mistakes and shortcomings and work with her gently for solutions
  • To ask her on dates regularly—to court her and to surprise her with unexpected adventures, especially romantic ones
  • To be helpful and cooperative when working with the children and with work in the home—to be willing to cook and change diapers and clean bathrooms, for starters
  • To be willing to sacrifice so that she can do things to achieve her true potential
  • To never forget the power and importance of flowers, chocolates and love notes
And this is what your husband really wants from his wife:
  • To respect him and honor him
  • To show him gentleness and tenderness—this is the irresistible force that will draw him to his wife forever
  • To believe in him and to trust him, even though he makes mistakes
  • To forgive him for his mistakes and shortcomings and work with him kindly for solutions
  • To support him in his work and career and church responsibilities
  • Speaking respectfully of him, especially in front of the children and her friends, even when he is not present
  • To create a cheerful, welcoming home environment
  • To be helpful and cooperative with money and other issues that are his main concern
  • To give him his space and allow him to recharge with activities of his choosing
  • To be willing to sacrifice so that he can do things to achieve his true potential
What else would be on your list? or what would take off? Please comment.